New Voices: Johnny Adimando

Ed. Note: our New Voices series was initiated last year by Sage Dawson in hopes of sharing work by emerging artists with our readership. She handed over the project to us, the editorial staff, and we cull the New Voices inbox for noteworthy work. As we are closing the blog at the end of the week, this will be our final installment of New Voices. Thanks to everyone who submitted work to this feature and apologies that time didn’t permit us to share more of the many worthwhile submissions.

Omnipresence. Dogma. Penitence. Taking cues from the disparate realms of science fiction and the occult, the meticulous work of Johnny Adimando reflects a dark world. he constructs Giger-esque models that speak to the infringing power of technology and the questionable motivations of its masters. Formally, the sculptural prints, drawings and photographs reflect an interest in complex symmetry, pattern, and architectural structure as they explore the places and persons of authority and their opposites.

The images below are accompanied by some words of Adimando’s thoughts…

Panopticon One, 2013, 23in x 24in x 3.25in. Screenprints, digital prints, and photo-polymer relief prints on cut and assembled archival paperboard. As the prototype for the overall project, this piece represents a preliminary construction utilizing a diverse visual vocabulary of printed matter, such as columns, panopticon design blueprints, architectural friezes, and technological schematics.

Panopticon One, 2013, 23in x 24in x 3.25in. Screenprints, digital prints, and photo-polymer
relief prints on cut and assembled archival paperboard. As the prototype for the overall project, this piece represents a preliminary construction utilizing
a diverse visual vocabulary of printed matter, such as columns, panopticon design blueprints,
architectural friezes, and technological schematics.

Scanning Drone, 2013, 32in x 53in x 20in. Screenprints, digital prints, image transfers, and incising on cut and assembled archival paperboard. This piece was created to function as the model for a fictional drone. It is outfitted with cameras and a multitude of radial lenses. Its geometric structure is meant to convey an ability to distort space and produce hi-frequency mechanical sounds. Within the larger fictional narrative I have constructed, this model drone is used to apprehend and transport the highest-profile prisoners.

Scanning Drone, 2013, 32in x 53in x 20in. Screenprints, digital prints, image transfers, and
incising on cut and assembled archival paperboard. This piece was created to function as the model for a fictional drone. It is outfitted with cameras
and a multitude of radial lenses. Its geometric structure is meant to convey an ability to distort
space and produce hi-frequency mechanical sounds. Within the larger fictional narrative I have
constructed, this model drone is used to apprehend and transport the highest-profile prisoners.

ITACCATI Prisoner (The Sage of Triangulation), 2013, 24in x 36in. Digital photograph on archival paper. The acronym ITACCATI stands for, “Inter-Dimensional Technological Advancement Consortium of Conspirators Against Transient Intelligences.” In the work, the ITACCATI manifest as anything geometric or technological and act as containments for amorphous/organic forms and energies. Their primary goal is to create a world of complete symmetry and perfect order; all things asymmetrical are viewed as abhorrent and in need of alteration and imprisonment. The figures, all self-portraits, are burdened by a form of technological imprisonment system; most often indicated by a headpiece or mask, at times attached to another structure they must hold or carry. The systems are tailored to each specific prisoner.

ITACCATI Prisoner (The Sage of Triangulation), 2013, 24in x 36in. Digital photograph on
archival paper. The acronym ITACCATI stands for, “Inter-Dimensional Technological Advancement Consortium of
Conspirators Against Transient Intelligences.” In the work, the ITACCATI manifest as anything
geometric or technological and act as containments for amorphous/organic forms and energies.
Their primary goal is to create a world of complete symmetry and perfect order; all things
asymmetrical are viewed as abhorrent and in need of alteration and imprisonment.
The figures, all self-portraits, are burdened by a form of technological imprisonment system;
most often indicated by a headpiece or mask, at times attached to another structure they must
hold or carry. The systems are tailored to each specific prisoner.

Meditation on the First Escape, 2014, 20.5in x 26in x 3.5in. Screenprints on cut and assembled archival paperboard. In the overarching narrative of this project mystical practices are often the cause for incarceration. The prisoners are radicals that seek to defy the prison utilizing occult practices, deep meditation, and remote viewing. This piece represents the narrative of the most wanted prisoner, and only successful escapee, known as “The Minotaur.”

Meditation on the First Escape, 2014, 20.5in x 26in x 3.5in. Screenprints on cut and
assembled archival paperboard. In the overarching narrative of this project mystical practices are often the cause for
incarceration. The prisoners are radicals that seek to defy the prison utilizing occult practices,
deep meditation, and remote viewing. This piece represents the narrative of the most wanted
prisoner, and only successful escapee, known as “The Minotaur.”

Sentinel Drone, 2015, 13in x 19in x 10in. Screenprints and digital prints on cut and assembled archival paperboard. These quadruped drones possess attack capabilities, monitor the prisons’ perimeter, and apprehend inmates making escape attempts.

Sentinel Drone, 2015, 13in x 19in x 10in. Screenprints and digital prints on cut and assembled
archival paperboard. These quadruped drones possess attack capabilities, monitor the prisons’ perimeter, and
apprehend inmates making escape attempts.

Ghost Generator, 2014, 42in x 31.5in. Acrylic, graphite, image transfer, ink, and screenprint on frosted drafting-film. “Ghost Generator” is a designation given to the prison indicated in this schematic. The structure is charged with holding inmates that have been given “eternal sentences.” It is said that once you enter the prison you become a “ghost.” Eternal sentences are maintained by an elaborate system of hyper-sleep chambers contained within the symmetrical labyrinth below the central tower. The design of those chambers is indicated on the sides of the drawing in what appear to be organic chrysalis-like forms.

Ghost Generator, 2014, 42in x 31.5in. Acrylic, graphite, image transfer, ink, and screenprint
on frosted drafting-film. “Ghost Generator” is a designation given to the prison indicated in this schematic. The structure
is charged with holding inmates that have been given “eternal sentences.” It is said that once
you enter the prison you become a “ghost.” Eternal sentences are maintained by an elaborate
system of hyper-sleep chambers contained within the symmetrical labyrinth below the central
tower. The design of those chambers is indicated on the sides of the drawing in what appear to
be organic chrysalis-like forms.

Map of the Fourth Prison in Ornate Frame, 2015, 37in x 50in x 5in. Charcoal, image transfer, ink, and screenprint on folded paper, with Screenprints, collage, and ink on cut and assembled archival paperboard. Currently, I am researching the prison construct in world mythos to develop work that references imprisonment by way of dogma, fear, and morality. I am also interested in Jeremy Bentham’s panopticon design and the modern day institutionalized global surveillance-structure. Here, I reference the Mayan myth of Xibalba, in which an individual must pass through a series of brutal prisons/tests at the consequence of death, humiliation, or salvation. In the fourth, one encounters ravenous nocturnal beasts, such as shrieking-bats. A bat motif is included on the ornate frame. The drawing housed within the frame is meant to reference a stolen architectural blueprint that is recovered at the time of a failed-escape-attempt. It is weathered, folded, and slightly “damaged.”

Map of the Fourth Prison in Ornate Frame, 2015, 37in x 50in x 5in. Charcoal, image
transfer, ink, and screenprint on folded paper, with Screenprints, collage, and ink on cut and
assembled archival paperboard. Currently, I am researching the prison construct in world mythos to develop work that references
imprisonment by way of dogma, fear, and morality. I am also interested in Jeremy Bentham’s
panopticon design and the modern day institutionalized global surveillance-structure.
Here, I reference the Mayan myth of Xibalba, in which an individual must pass through a series of
brutal prisons/tests at the consequence of death, humiliation, or salvation. In the fourth, one
encounters ravenous nocturnal beasts, such as shrieking-bats. A bat motif is included on the
ornate frame. The drawing housed within the frame is meant to reference a stolen architectural
blueprint that is recovered at the time of a failed-escape-attempt. It is weathered, folded, and
slightly “damaged.”

Sleeper Drone, 2015, 24in x 25in x 19in. Screenprints and digital prints on cut and assembled archival paperboard. These drones are designed specifically to hover above the prisoners’ head while they are sleeping, and transmit every movement to the guard tower.

Sleeper Drone, 2015, 24in x 25in x 19in. Screenprints and digital prints on cut and assembled
archival paperboard.
These drones are designed specifically to hover above the prisoners’ head while they are
sleeping, and transmit every movement to the guard tower.

Complex Eye, 2013, 30in x 22.5in x 10in. Screenprints and image transfers on cut and assembled archival paperboard. This is a model design for an “eye” structure device that would be fitted atop the central tower of the panopticon surveillance system. The piece uses manipulated architectural motifs to camouflage a complex system of parts, lenses and scopes.

Complex Eye, 2013, 30in x 22.5in x 10in. Screenprints and image transfers on cut and assembled archival paperboard. This is a model design for an “eye” structure device that would be fitted atop the central tower of
the panopticon surveillance system. The piece uses manipulated architectural motifs to
camouflage a complex system of parts, lenses and scopes.

VOID SCHEMATIC – 01-05, 2015, 4.25 x 8in (printed and bound scale).

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Categories: Artists, Artwork


One Response to “New Voices: Johnny Adimando”

  1. Johnny says:

    The first five issues of the “Void Schematic” zine can be viewed at this link:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uC1z0EHX4AY&feature=youtu.be