Friday / Part Two – MAPC 2012

Palette, prisma color on lithograph by James D. Butler

There’s lots to talk about so I’m just going to dive right in.

Demo: MetalSkate with Koichi Yamamoto

Panel: Selling Out? Moderated by Charles Beneke

Demo: Mokulito, Lithography on Wood with Eszter Augustine-Sziksz and Justyna Mazur

Demo: Stencils with Jennifer Ghormley

Summaries Below-

Koichi's prints, so large they had to be displayed on the floor

Demo: MetalSkate with Koichi Yamamoto

Koichi had free run of the studio during his demonstration. He had set up a camera that captured and projected his movements as he engraved a copper plate. The plate was then printed on to eastern paper which was then folded and then run through the press again, transferring some of the initial printing to the facing side of the paper. Lines smoothly run into and out of the folded center line of the completed prints which were then compiled into larger compositions. It was a joy to see Koichi at work and to see the parts become a whole.

 

Panel: Selling Out? Moderated by Charles Beneke

This panel discussed the merits and challenges of incorporating entrepreneurial programming into academic printshops. Panelists, Denise Bookwalter, Bob Erickson, Lari Gibbons, Nicole Hand and Scott Smith presented and conversed about their experiences. Academic shops routinely find that selling art made by or in concert with students can fill extraneous, or sometime fundamental, budgetary needs. Possible methods of selling art included print sales set up on campus, or taking print sales out to community venues. Novel ideas were ‘print prom’, for $12-20 tickets were sold to a dance party and at the party each person received a shirt silkscreened with their choice of either a tux or a gown image. Also, having a sale hosted by a local collector, the collector’s art is taken down and the art available for sale is displayed on their walls and open to the public for purchase.

Many ideas brought up questions for further thought: do these activities get prints out into the community thereby increasing appreciation for prints or do they devalue printmaking as a fine art media by making printmaking subservient to non-artistic priorities? Structures were also discussed, should entrepreneurial skills be taught as a special class or should these activities be extra-curricular? On the whole, the panel participants viewed entrepreneurial activities as positive team building, community engaging, activities that also supplement the programs that enhance students’ educational experience. As the last slide of the presentation reminded us, when a balance can be found, these activities become a way of not ‘selling out’ but ‘buying in’.

Demo: Mokulito, Lithography on Wood with Eszter Augustine-Sziksz and Justyna Mazur

My cursory impression is that Mokulito seems similar to Xerox Litho except that the substrate for the toner is wood instead of paper. In this demo Xerox toner was transferred from photocopies to a wood plate with solvent pens. Other mark making techniques discussed were carbon paper melted on to the wood with a clothes iron and sticks of cold butter as drawing material. Then when the image is in place on the wood the plate is treated with gum arabic and left to dry over night. When a day has passed gum is washed out with water and then the plate is inked like a traditional litho and printed on an intaglio press with rails the same height as plate. Ink is applied, however, with foam rollers and ink is modified with #3 litho varnish. Benefits of this technique: you can carve the plate, printing without a litho press or in an area of the world where litho plates and stones are hard to come by.

Demo: Stencils with Jennifer Ghormley

Jennifer used .003 thickness, frosted on both sides, Dura-lar cut with an X-acto, as a screen stencil to make an array of screen prints. She covered the benefits of using Dura-lar stencils: quick and easy to change screen imagery, reusable and washable, and it is a highly accessible technique. Stencils were adhered to the screen with packing tape.

More soon.

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